Can A King Move 2.5 Steps?

Guides / By Andrew Hercules
can a king move 2.5 steps

When you are starting out chess for the first time, it’s important to understand clearly how the pieces move over the board.

The most significant piece in chess is by far the king since the loss of the king signifies the end of the game. However, the fact that the king is the most important piece by no means makes it the most powerful. It can’t sacrifice itself nor can it jump over other pieces like the knight can.

Speaking of the knight, we know that it moves three squares in total – two squares in one direction, and then one more box at a right angle. Some players refer to this as L shape or 2.5 steps.

Can A King Move 2.5 Steps?

The king however can NOT move 2.5 steps as the knight would. The king can move only one square in any direction, whether it’s forward backward or sideways.  

What Piece Can Move 2.5 Steps?

The knight also known as the horse is the only piece that can move 2 and a half steps. This makes it very unique than any other piece on the board. Not only can it move 2.5 steps but it has the ability leap/jump over other pieces pieces as well.

Knights are referred to as very tricky pieces unlike the king. The knight can fork the whole royal family all at once. Because of this characteristic, the knight should be respected at all times.

Comparison between the king and the knight

 

King Knight
Can NOT move 2.5 steps Can move 2.5 steps
Control a total of 9 squares Control a total of 8 squares
Not a tactical piece Very tactical piece
Not a powerful piece Not a powerful piece
Losing the king is game over Losing the knight is bad

Related Post: How the horse moves in chess

Andrew Hercules

Hercules Chess, launched in 2020, is a website that teaches you about chess. We started as a chess blog and became a chess training platform in early 2022.

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